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Monthly Archives: June 2019

I’ve watched the pivotal opening scene in Burning a couple of times now, the part that foreshadows and describes the entire movie; and I think I finally figured it out.

First, there is a scene about miming the act of eating a tangerine, but the important tidbit is that in order to be successful; you don’t have to believe that there is a physical tangerine, just that it tastes yummy. I think this describes the relationship that the girl has with the poor guy. She believes that she can rely on him/he is her BF (even if he doesn’t think of it like this), so it makes his later words to her even more hurtful.

Then the discussion quickly changes to little and great hunger. Little hunger is the hunger you feel when you if you haven’t eaten, but great hunger is hunger for life. I think this describes the rich guy and his quest to find meaning in his life when all the basics are taken care of.

Finally, as a bonus, the girl asks the poor guy to take care of her cat, saying a cat shouldn’t be moved from their home. I think this is meant to describe the poor guy who just isn’t able to comprehend the changes that are about to happen around him.

Even with this theory, still a great movie!


Well Aquaman started really slow, in the way of many other DC movies (bad plot, dialogue and corny scenarios). In the comics, Aquaman was always a cheesy hero whose powers aren’t that helpful (how many times do heroes fight on water??). So the premise didn’t have a lot of things to make it good. The fact that they portrayed Atlanteans as a futuristic civilization hidden underwater, with amazing submarine craft is just crazy. The only thing holding the film together was Jason Momoa’s stoic charisma.

Secondly, I was confused about the timeline. This movie seemingly happens after Justice League (they mention Steppenwolf), but I thought Aquaman went to Atlantis to protect the Mother Box (wasn’t Mera there too?). The movie also seemed to channel Tomb Raider a bit when they went to the desert.

Things started to get better once they entered the “final dungeon”. Seeing Aquaman in his costume, even though it is corny, was great. I just can’t get behind the idea that the Atlanteans were hidden or can stay hidden for so long even with huge armies amassing and fighting. Two out of five stars


I was looking forward to this film since it was part of the X-Men universe, even though the comic series “Logan” wasn’t that good (it was too far fetched). I remember the movie version received good reviews so it didn’t seem like they used the comic book as source material.

Logan is well deserving of its R rating (very bloody) and it is also very dark. It is one of those stories that comic books writers go to when they run out of present day stories to tell (a What-If from the future). However, this one is only 10 years down the road with a Wolverine that is incognito, with a limo, and a limp (which was what I was trying to type before autocorrect took over), as well as literally carrying around a 90-year old Professor X wherever he has to go. This is not a dystopia (society seems OK with self driving tractor trailers), but it is pretty grim for good guys. It’s not a movie where the heroes get beat up, then miraculously climb off the floor, find their cosmic second wind, and take over; in this one, they just get beat up more and more. If anything, this is a realistic comic book film.

Like most future Wolverine films, it is a character study of him and how he behaves when he’s not killing. However, unlike Days of Future Past; he’s not being a hero. He’s just a guy who wants to mind his own business but gets pulled into being a caretaker, driver, babysitter, and finally a hero.

The pacing in the film is great. Being a dark film, there isn’t really comedy. Instead the scenes of despair, dementia and death are contrasted with plain normal life. I’m not sure if the film itself is great, or if it’s because they’ve taken the characters that we know through many X-Men films and truly given them a new angle. In any case, I thought this movie deserved a four out of five star rating.


If Captain Marvel came out in any other year, it might have been considered a B-list Marvel movie. Maybe not at the level of Ant Man, but not as hyped as Guardians of the Galaxy. But because everyone knew she would play a pivotal role in Avengers: Endgame, this ended up being a must see movie.

Maybe the producers saw it that way too because I think it is a quality and balanced film. It didn’t try too hard to be funny (compared to Guardians of the Galaxy, where I remember that the “comedy” from Rocket was just annoying), and brought in the retro early 90s without beating us up about it (better than Bumblebee). It fit the times (many women in key roles) and was almost a film about the real international man of mystery, Nick Fury. There was a lot of thing going for it even if the source material wasn’t the most famous.

I liked the focus on the Kree/Skrull war. I don’t remember all the facts, but portraying the Skrulls as the good guys doesn’t seem right (why about the FF’s beef with Super Skrull?). I liked how there were cameos from Guardians of the Galaxy, although I don’t remember what those characters did in those movies anymore (the Kree, Korath). I’m also not sure that Captain Marvel had cosmic powers either? In any case, these didn’t detract from the story. Captain Marvel is a solid three out of five stars, and the Marvel version of Wonder Woman.


What attracted me to Vox Lux was the cast (Jude Law, Natalie Portman), given their track record and the non-blockbuster nature of this film; I thought there was a decent chance that this would be good even if the description didn’t sound like something I would enjoy much.

The film was broken into 2 parts. The first tells the story of how “Celeste” went from a 14 y/o high school student to a pop star via a school shooting. That was moderately interesting because it showed how the music entertainment process worked (most likely sanitized already). The second part jumped 15 years later when Celeste is now in her 30s (still a pop star) and honestly the movie got lost there. In the first half, there was a direction to the film, but the second half follows Celeste around for an afternoon. Was the point to see her reaction (or non-reaction) to a shooting much like the one that launched her career? Was it a social commentary on how stardom can change an individual? Was it a behind-the-scenes look at what super stardom is like? I couldn’t tell because whatever it was trying to do wasn’t conveyed.

Even the final little nugget of narration doesn’t really explain why or what is happening. Because the movie left its rails, this only gets two out of five stars.


It’s June already and the school year is almost done. The weeks past by quickly if not the days. A lot of stuff happened this month in real life; but not a lot of blogging (well no movies at least).

The month revolved around our planned vacation. We knew we were going to go somewhere the week of Victoria Day, but it took a few months to figure out where. Finally we decided to take a cruise to the Bahamas from Orlando, and then bookend a couple of days there. We avoid Disney World theme parks this time because we’ve done them so many times in the past years, but it’s hard to avoid Disney (or theme parks) in general when you’re in Orlando. We did end up going to Seaworld for one day though, and caught a couple of their animal shows.

I didn’t do any traveling for work in May but the few weeks before vacation was still hectic. As Spring is critical real estate season, we wanted to make a quick change to make sure our house was on the market properly. So we had a week and a half of interviewing the right agent, deciding, and setting up the property again.

Weather is heating up in Toronto. Not as bad as it was in Florida and the Caribbean but it’s almost time for the AC to get started.